1.) Please provide the following general hospital information:
Name of hospital
Name of Trust
What is the population size of your hospital’s catchment area?
What is the specialty of the individual advising upon the majority of the clinical information of this form?
Does your hospital have a casualty/emergency department?
Does your hospital have a separate paediatric casualty/emergency department on site?
Is there a ‘scrotal pain’ or ‘suspected testicular torsion’ pathway or Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) relating to this issue for paediatric patients in place at your site?
2.) At your hospital, which speciality and grade of doctor or surgeon most commonly makes the initial assessment of a paediatric patient with a suspected testicular torsion, other than A&E staff? Please provide an answer for each of the following time slots provided.
3.) If a paediatric suspected testicular torsion required emergency scrotal exploration, would the operation take place at your site? Please answer the appropriate column of questions according to whether your answer is A, B or C.
3.A.) Table A
Which grade and specialty of surgeon most commonly operates during normal working hours?
Which grade and specialty surgeon most commonly operates outside of normal working hours on weekdays?
Which grade and specialty surgeon most commonly operates on the weekend?
3.B.) Table B
Which grade and specialty surgeon most commonly operates during normal working hours?
On weekdays outside of normal working hours, do emergency scrotal explorations take place at your hospital? If yes please specify the grade and speciality of the surgeon that most commonly operates.
On weekends, do emergency scrotal explorations take place at your hospital?
Do any surgeons travel from a separate hospital to any of the sites in your Trust to undertake emergency paediatric scrotal exploration surgery rather than transfer the patient?
3.C.) Table C
To which hospital(s) do you transfer patients, for emergency scrotal exploration?
4.) Please answer the following questions, with separate answers for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015.
How many emergency scrotal explorations on paediatric patients to exclude testicular torsion were carried out at your site?
How many emergency scrotal explorations on paediatric patients resulted in finding an unsalvageable or infarcted testis, resulting in orchidectomy?
5.) Please provide the following information about audits into paediatric testicular torsions.
At your hospital, has there been an audit or review conducted into the length of time taken, for a paediatric patient with a suspected testicular torsion, to arrive in the operating theatre from initial triage in the emergency department?
6.) How many cases presenting as paediatric scrotal pain or paediatric suspected testicular torsion resulted in incident reports, serious untoward incidents or legal proceedings in 2013, 2014, 2015?
Please attach an anonymised copy of all incident reports, and root cause analysis reports with outcomes identified in this question.
7.) In your organisation, who will be the most senior clinician to review this FOI request before submission?

Download response Paediatric scrotal pain. 190219